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© 2019 Voodoo Queen Digital Magazine

Larry Worhol - Guitarist/Pianist, (Composer)
Ashley Worhol - Vocalist/Pianist, (Composer)
Craig Malinowski - Bassist/Visual Artist
Marty Naul- Drums

Voodoo Queen Digital Magazine's Interview with Worhol

VQDM:  How did the band come together in the beginning and was it made for a specific purpose other then just to share music?

 

Ashley: Both my father and myself have always shared the same dream of creating music. Within his life he has experienced the many sides to this industry and once we decided to take everything on full force as a team, that is when Worhol was formed. At first, it was just my dad and me. We began writing music that spoke to us and soon after we were in search for dedicated musicians who shared our dream and creativity. In life, there are moments when you have intuitions. For me, I knew music was my chosen path and there was going to be nothing that could stop me in my tracks. In my perspective, what I hope for in our music, is that it will have the purpose of healing. I want to ascend our music to the level where everyone can relate to the messages yet also have curiosity. I want people to ask questions, to find the hidden messages within my lyrics, because they are there, you just have to listen closely. 

 

VQDM:  Worhol itself has a very interesting history as far as related people in the art and music industry. Has it ever been misunderstood by some and attached to the name or thought of Andy Worhol?

 

Ashley: In interviews we have experienced on multiple occasions where the interviewer would jokingly ask if we were related to Andy Warhol, assuming we were going to say no but when our answer is given as yes you can tell there is a bit of a pause. Andy presented himself to the world by giving a new creative approach on art, film, really anything he was involved in. Where he created a new form of art, I like to think Worhol has created a new form of music. We are secure within our sound and like Andy, we are loyal to ourselves by believing in what we are trying to accomplish.

 

VQDM:  How young was Ashley Worhol when the music first started flowing out of her either through interest in playing piano or singing?

 

Ashley: This question makes me smile. Recently, I was going back through old family photos and found endless photos of me at a young age either sitting on the piano bench or holding a microphone. One photo was even of me in one of those walker toys (I must have been maybe a year old) and I had walked myself to the piano and was trying to touch one of the keys. From a very early age I was memorized with the piano. There was even a day when I surprised my parents. I was sitting at the piano and by ear I figured out the theme song from “Free Willy”. I remember my parents running from the other room shocked but proud to say the least. My parents also have video recordings of me trying to sing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game”. It is quite hysterical actually because I couldn’t pronounce all of the words so most of them just slid together! I also remember always finding myself under our grand piano listening to my father practice. Sometimes I would sneak in there because the music was so relaxing. Music has always been and will always be my life.

 

VQDM: The recent video (Already Forgotten) has had quite a buzz since it's release. Whose vision was it for the visual short film like style?

 

Ashley: I have always enjoyed watching music videos that gave the impression of a short film. When we were in the stages of planning for this music video with Multi Mojo Productions based out of Los Angeles, we knew we wanted to create something that was going to have a deep visual presentation. Because of the lyrics and the subject within this song we decided to make the bold move and create the storyline around abuse. This is a personal topic for me and I knew I wanted to create a story that might make people feel uneasy to watch but this video also brings awareness to the signs and what we should all look for. No one truly knows what someone might be going through. Whether it’s a friend or a stranger, sometimes people do cry out for help, but we might not know what to look for. When the team gave me their impression of the video and the shots they were wanting I at first thought maybe it was too violent but sometimes you have to show the bad to truly get a point across. My hope with this message is that if anyone knows or is currently going through this situation, they deserve more, they are worth more and there is help. Because this is a personal topic, I can relate to the feelings of fear, settling, the constant thought of “oh he didn’t mean it”. I can promise you that to love someone unconditionally you shouldn’t have to make yourself believe that it’s right or constantly be told, “I’m sorry”. There is so much more to life than to sacrifice your own happiness.

 

VQDM: How has your reactions been from European fans? You have a similar style to Epica and for me personally that is a huge compliment.

Craig: Our European fans are great! Sadly, though the only non-USA tour we’ve done so far is in the UK. It was amazing, and I can’t wait to go back overseas. We still get a lot of great messages from fans in Europe and radio stations. There are also many other fans in areas where symphonic music seems to thrive like South America and Japan. I look forward to the day we can do a world tour and reach all our fans around the world.

 

VQDM:  What is the band's goals for 2018 as far as touring or other major news that you would be able to indulge us in?

Craig: I’d say is to expand our reach as best we can. This means a larger presence online. We are planning for more music videos, promotions, and any ways we can continue to expand out reach. We of course are also looking into tours and festivals.

 

Ashley: I have to agree with Craig! This year we are really focusing on our visual appearance. We have quite a bit of music video shoots scheduled that I am extremely excited about! For a while now I have had visions of what I wanted for “Voices From Above” and now that we are at the point of actually planning things out I can’t wait for the fans to see what we have planned. We also have several surprises this year in regard to our music. Later this year we will also be releasing an EP.

 

VQDM: With the symphonic genre have you felt that you have been pushed into more of a rock or more of a metal when it comes to showcases and what would you prefer to play in front of as far as overall audiences?

Craig: We have played with all kinds of genres. From what I can say, most at least from our hometown and neighboring areas, there is a larger metal scene. I don’t have a preference on what type of style we play with, as long as everyone’s having a great time. At the end of the day, that is what it’s all about anyway.

 

Larry: It think it really depends on the song and its presentation. Some orchestrated songs have more power and punch using metal crunches, scales, and techniques, whereas some songs have a better feel using traditional rock steady beats and harmonic drives. I think however, our style is recognized more on the metal side because of how we incorporate both the visual and musical impact on our audiences based on our powerful presentation.

 

 

VQDM: How important is it to keep to your roots when it comes to writing styles or do you feel as a progressive band that coming out of your comfort zone from time to time has helped you?

 

Larry: I try to never forget my roots. I have had the honor of living my life in an era of some of the greatest rock and roll guitarists and bands that changed the lives of many listeners. It was an era of music that changed lifestyles and fashion, and every musician had their own style which made listening never boring. Our music has presented a change in my comfort zone, but it has and will be a learning and productive experience.

 

VQDM: If you could give one band member a nickname based on his or hers specific appetite on the road what would it be and why?

 

Larry: Without a doubt, it is Ashley Worhol. She should change her name to Tweety Bird. She eats like a bird. She takes one bite of something and says she is finished.

 

 

VQDM: Having personal lives and working in the music and art industry of any sort is always a challenge, do you as a band feel it is important to play and connect with all age aspects?

 

Larry: As a salesman, businessman, and investor, profit is made by a product on the market that appeals to all.  It is important to cater to all ages. I want everyone to want to listen to our music and purchase our CD's.  That is what made the Beatles so successful. They had a song for everybody!

 

Marty: Yes, absolutely! Music has no age barrier, and we’re constantly seeing this in our audiences. For this reason, all our music is “kid friendly”, no bad language onstage and no profane lyrics in our songs. I also teach drums and percussion, and I have one student who is 8 years old, and he’s learning to play rock songs from the 80s! His choice, not mine, so there you are!

 

 

 

VQDM: What is your major influence as a whole band and if you could play with one band (dead or alive) and be able to share the stage with them who would it be and why?

 

Marty: I would have to say that our major influence as a band would be Nightwish. We’ve all seen them in concert and they’re awesome! I’d love to share the stage with those guys!

 

 

VQDM: Do any of you feel that age has a limit as far as making it big in the spotlight for a musician?

 

Marty: I don’t think there are any limits at all, as long as one can still physically play his or her instrument, and I think we prove this! Ashley is in her 20s, Craig is in his early 30s, and Larry and I are...older! It’s an interesting dynamic, not only having the wide difference in ages, but also having a father/daughter team in the band is a unique experience.

 

Craig: History has proven that age doesn’t matter much. I've seen really young musicians and much older ones also find there way into the spotlight. Each has their own hurdles though. Someone young may seem more impressive to have achieved such skill at the younger age but also may find themselves more taken advantage of. It might become harder the older you get but it’s all situational and finding out what works for you to be stable and still live your dream.

 

VQDM: Has there been anyone so far that has stood above the rest  in which you all would love to give shout outs or kudos to for helping you or supporting you along the way?

 

Marty: I’d have to say that former Evanescence guitarist John LeCompt has been very supportive and has turned into a very good friend of ours. He is also our studio engineer/producer, so he works very closely with us to help develop our sound on our records, which we strive to replicate in our live performances.

 

Ashley: I have had the privilege of meeting many people in this industry that still have the goal in mind of helping musicians. I think it is so important to have that personal connection and to know that there are people who believe in you just as much as we believe in ourselves. We have been blessed with amazing radio hosts and magazines that have shared our music. At the end of the day word of mouth is how you stay alive and our fans constantly impress us. We have met people like yourself (VQM) who every month continue to support your dolls in everything that we do. We have been fortunate for the partnerships we have made both in sponsorships and in building our team. I also have to agree with Marty, John LeCompt saw our vision and truly has become an incredible friend. I have quickly learned, if you support those who support you, they will always stand out above the rest and continue to shine light on what you are doing. It is a two-way road. We are all in this together.

 

 

VQDM: In this business there is many that talk a good talk but few that follow through completely or stay true to their words and passions, have you met any along the way that have been loyal and sincere in your best interest as well as their own?

 

Marty: Wow, that’s a hard one to answer! I’ve been in the music business for so long, I’ve met many, many people who are absolutely first-rate. Unfortunately, I’ve also met many, many people who are just a little less than first-rate!

 

Ashley: I am sure in any industry, one will face this and will sadly face this more than once. We have had our fair share of both sides. They end up being a wall that you have to break down and move on to the next. I personally have learned the signs to watch out for and have learned to trust my inner intuition which has recently resulted in proving what I thought to be right. There are still people out there who truly do care for the artist and something I will always stand by is, “be the reason someone believes in goodness of people…”

 

 

VQDM: Finally what is your favorite song from your current album to play live, is there one you would prefer to play acoustically sorta speak and is there one that your wanting to be more heard?

 

Larry: "Time to Say Goodbye". It was my first love and will always be. I have such a feeling of emotion when I play it. I can really dig deep into my guitar and express my emotions from the notes I play. Very touching indeed. 

 

Marty: I think “Already Forgotten” remains high on my list, as it’s a pretty straight-ahead rocking tune. “Voices From Above” would translate really well to being an acoustic tune. As far as a song that needs to be heard more, we do have a ballad on the CD called “In this Town”, and I’d like to perform it more often than we do. It’s a really pretty song, and it deserves its place in the spotlight!

VQDM-2018